Ornament

Today’s prompt and DeviantArt link. The VA OT Group topic for today was urgent care.

When the nurse entered the room wearing dark green scrubs with name badge, stethoscope, watch, pager, and the other tools necessary to do her job attached to and hanging on her scrubs, it reminded me more of ornaments on a Christmas tree than medical equipment readily at hand. I tried to recall exactly what it was that I did to end up here. In the military, urgent care treatment is never pursued out of choice, but rather the follow-on action of doing something stupid, even if the stupid thing seemed like a good idea or the best option at the time.

My right leg hurt when I moved it. But I wasn’t sure if the pain came from the ankle or the knee. Both hurt. Did those injuries happen at the same time? Or did one happen before the other? While I was contemplating my right leg, the nurse said something I didn’t quite understand and then promptly stuck a hypodermic into the IV bag. She blurred out of the room and I closed my eyes for a moment.

When I opened my eyes again, the nurse and some other guy in dark blue scrubs were both moving me from the gurney onto a horizontal surface that looked like a conveyor belt feeding into some kind of stargate looking thing. I said I didn’t want to go through the gate because I’d seen that movie. But they didn’t seem to hear me, or chose to ignore me and put me on the conveyor belt anyway. I thought I should resist, but sometime during my stay, my body switched sides on me and wasn’t in the mood to cooperate. Besides, I’m a little tired. I’ll just close my eyes for a

I opened my eyes and discovered that if they’d put me through the stargate, the nurse went with me. She was hovering over my leg with a doctor next to her. I guessed she was a doctor because she was wearing a lab coat over her scrubs. Whatever they were doing to the leg, it didn’t hurt. But they both appeared surprised when they looked at me after I asked, “how’s it look?” The nurse used the hypo again and I promptly

When I finished the blink, I was in another room. This time both the doctor and the Christmas tree nurse were gone. I stayed still for a minute as I mentally attempted to gather information about my surroundings. White room. Bright lights. Sterile. Lots of drawers and cabinets. Still attached to an IV. I looked toward my right leg, it was covered, but otherwise still appeared to be there. As I was taking this in, another nurse, purple scrubs no lab coat, walked into the room. When she saw I was awake, she pulled out a hypo and said, “get some rest, Captain Rand”. I started to say I’m pretty sure I was a lieutenant when I came in but my eyelids fell before the words reached my tongue from my brain.

When my eyelids rose again, the nurse in the purple scrubs was there, but so was some lady general I’d never seen before surrounded by an entourage of people wearing officer ranks and looking completely lost outside of an office setting. I think I recognized my squadron commander among the brass. There was the one guy who didn’t look lost, I’m pretty sure that was him.

A female lieutenant started reading something. My ears seemed to be at the bottom of a well and I didn’t really hear it. The general walked over to where I lay, pinned some purple ribbon with a metal object attached to it to the pocket of my scrubs, pinned a set of captain bars next to the first item, and promptly disappeared when I blinked as I was saying, “thank you, ma’am”.

When the blink ended, the nurse in the purple scrubs had returned and was joined by a guy in tan scrubs and they’re telling me it’s time to go. I’m still not sure where I am or how I got here. All I know for sure is I ended up in urgent care, fell asleep several times, and woke up with a medal and a promotion. The fun part will be figuring out what happened before that.

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